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Episode 50 The Star That Fell On Ann Hodges

In November 1954, Ann Hodges was resting in her Oak Grove, Alabama home when a meteorite crashed through her roof and hit her. She became the only known human being to survive a meteorite strike. Ann was thrown into a media spotlight she never wanted and learned that fame can cause more damage than a meteorite landing on your hip. 

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Ann stands in her home, holding the meteorite that hit her in 1954

Ann Hodges was featured in Life Magazine with her husband Eugene. The feature included photos of Ann with the doctor who treated her on the day she was injured and a photo of Ann wrapped in quilts as she was on the day she was injured. She’s pictured laughing with her then husband, Eugene.

Ann Hodges and her doctor show the bruise she sustained as a result of the meteorite hit Photo: LIFE Magazine
Ann Hodges “recreates” moment she was wrapped in quilts when meteorite hit her. Photo: LIFE Magazine

Ann was invited to appear on Gary Moore’s I’ve Got a Secret. You can see her appearance on the show here…

Ann Hodges remains the only person in history to have suffered a verifiable injury as the result of a direct hit from a meteorite. The rock remains on display in the Alabama Museum of Natural History.

Hodges Meteorite on display at Alabama Museum of Natural History

Episode Sources

The True Story of History’s Only Known Meteorite Victim”. National Geographic. 30 November 2016.
A star fell on Alabama”. The Tuscaloosa News. 30 November 2004.
A star fell on SylacaugaThe Decatur Daily News. 30 November 2006.
Sylacauga Meteorite Fall 1“. Journal of the Alabama Academy of Science, Vol. 61, No. 2. April 1990.
Hodges Meteorite StrikeEncyclopedia of Alabama. 22 November 2016.

Music

Theme Song “Dark & Troubled” by Panthernburn. Special thanks to Phillip St Ours for permission for use. 

Additional Music

“Stars Fell On Alabama” by Guy Lombardo, Composed by Frank Perkins with lyrics by Mitchell Parish, 1934. “Atlantean Twilight”, “Dark Fog”, “Ambient” by Kevin MacLeod(https://incompetech.com); “Featherlight” by Lee Rosevere; The Big Sky by Purple Planet Music Licensed under Creative Commons

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